The Anglo-Australian : Between Colony and Metropolis in Rosa Praed’s ‘The Right Honourable’ and Policy and Passion

The Right Honourable:· A Romance of Society and Politics opens on a boat off the coast of Australia with an encounter between an English politician who has spent time in Australia and America, and an Australian woman with whom he will conduct a thwarted love affair. Written in collaboration with Irish politician Justin McCarthy, it is a romance played out across the background of political intrigue in London, and colonial ambition. This novel is an example of the interest and difficulty of making a critical appraisal of Rosa Praed's work, for it challenges several of the frameworks critics habitually use to approach a literary text: authorship and authority, literary genre and status, and nationality. In terms of authorship Praed wrote in a number of collaborative arrangements, some more explicitly acknowledged than others. In terms of status and market, she occupies an awkward position between the poles of the serious and the pot-boiling novelist, something Praed points to repeatedly in representations of novelists in her work, and as the reception of 'The Right Honourable' suggests.

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Published 1 May 2012 in Volume 27 No. 1. Subjects: Internationalism, Literary collaboration, Rosa Praed, 19th Century Women Writers.

Cite as: Lamond, Julieanne. ‘The Anglo-Australian : Between Colony and Metropolis in Rosa Praed’s ‘The Right Honourable’ and Policy and Passion.’ Australian Literary Studies, vol. 27, no. 1, 2012. https://doi.org/10.20314/als.e54f79e8d2.