Review of Making Books: Contemporary Australian Publishing. Edited by David Carter and Anne Galligan.

This volume of writings from UQP is a timely contribution to a cultural arena currently caught up in discussions about publishing and books, about priorities and stances, traditional and new technology fom1ats for books, and what a bookshop - chain or independent- can do in the era of an online world where consumers have more control over how they buy books. lt follows the release of two volumes in what looks like a limited series. TI1e second one, Paper Empires: A History of the Book in Australia (U of Queensland P, 2006) had the whiff of a book that had taken too long in gestation: parts of it read as out of date or curiously incomplete ·in its case-study format. Making Books is of a different order - largely up to date in an ever-changing and volatile industry, and relevant in its attempt to steer a path through a myriad of issues clustering around this object: the book. As we all know, those of us who revere and claim books as more than tools, more like sustenance and Jove-objects, books are some of our most heavily invested possessions, as well as heavy, space-eating things that surround us and oppress us whenever we have to move them.

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Published 1 May 2009 in Volume 24 No. 1. Subjects: Book history, Publishing.

Cite as: White, Terri-Ann. ‘Review of Making Books: Contemporary Australian Publishing. Edited by David Carter and Anne Galligan..’ Australian Literary Studies, vol. 24, no. 1, 2009. https://doi.org/10.20314/als.c0e082e4ce.