Review of The Third Metropolis: Imagining Brisbane through Art and Literature 1940-1970, by William Hatherell.

For those who hail from the rest of the Australian continent, the rivalry between Sydney and Melbourne on various fronts - culture, style, political significance and tourist appeal, the list goes on - can be somewhat overwhelming, if not simply exasperating. Too frequently the local histories and cultures of these two cities and their states take on national dimensions while the significance of other cities, such as Brisbane and Adelaide - identified by William Hatherell as the two contenders for the title of the third Australian metropolis- is often either under-estimated or forgotten entirely. Hatherell's history of postwar Brisbane, The Third Metropolis: Imagining Brisbane through Art and Literature 1940- 1970, does not, however, establish another inter-city rivalry, nor does it seek to do so. By examining the various cultural networks and movements present in Brisbane throughout this period, as well as the city's lingering presence in the works produced by writers and artists who grew up, lived and worked there, Hatherell reveals the city's vibrant cultural heritage as well as illuminating the complex connections between place, personal and urban identity, and creativity.

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Published 1 November 2008 in Volume 23 No. 4. Subjects: Queensland.

Cite as: Carniel, Jessica. ‘Review of The Third Metropolis: Imagining Brisbane through Art and Literature 1940-1970, by William Hatherell..’ Australian Literary Studies, vol. 23, no. 4, 2008. https://doi.org/10.20314/als.4b2a61ddff.