Review of Writing in Hope and Fear: Literature as Politics in Postwar Australia, by John McLaren, and A Rare Bird: Penguin Books in Australia 1946-96, by Geoffrey Dutton.

These very different books - one a study of cultural conflicts and controversies, particularly of how these were pursued in little magazines; the other a commissioned history of a major publishing company - have common interests in both the conceptual construction and the material production (and dissemination) of 'Australian literature' since World War II. Indeed, readers of both will find frequent overlaps in the versions of cultural (and especially literary) history that their authors, prominent participants in many of the movements and events they present, offer.

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Published 1 May 1997 in Volume 18 No. 1. Subjects: Politics.

Cite as: Kiernan, Brian. ‘Review of Writing in Hope and Fear: Literature as Politics in Postwar Australia, by John McLaren, and A Rare Bird: Penguin Books in Australia 1946-96, by Geoffrey Dutton..’ Australian Literary Studies, vol. 18, no. 1, 1997. https://doi.org/10.20314/als.98bbac2f3f.