Manifesto of the Senses : Blind Sightedness in Christina Stead’s For Love Alone

Abstract

‘What I aim to show in this essay is how and with what personal and political force the narrative re-presents the reading process itself, how it demands the reader’s active co-operation and interpretation, to the point of entrapping us in blindness - or rather in a blind sightedness - that doubles that of its protagonist, Teresa Hawkins. In so doing, the novel performs the questions it poses about romance and realism, idealism and materialism, and conveys, inter alia, its response to mid-twentieth century debates about the literature of revolution.’ (53-54)

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Published 1 October 2009 in Manifesting Australian Literary Feminisms: Nexus and Faultlines. Subjects: Feminist theory, Narrative techniques, Perspectives.

Cite as: Rooney, Brigid. ‘Manifesto of the Senses : Blind Sightedness in Christina Stead’s For Love Alone.’ Australian Literary Studies, vol. 24, no. 3-4/, 2009. https://doi.org/10.20314/als.d2972e660d.