‘What Would Civilisation Be without a Gun?’ The Resistant Land in Sarah Campion’s Burdekin Trilogy

Elizabeth Lawson's 'biographical-critical survey' published in ALS in 2004 was the most recent of several efforts to win for Sarah Campion's novels the attention that their literary distinction warrants. Due attention has been deferred, I suspect, by the wide-ranging iconoclasm of Campion's fiction, which has confirmed its place in the 'separate but repressed' traditions of women's writing? In this essay I hope to maintain the momentum generated by Lawson by discussing a feature central to Campion's 1940s Burdekin trilogy that has not been analysed in depth, namely her complex responses as a visiting European to the Australian land and bush. I intend to consider the ways in which these responses are relevant to the author's political thinking, and to her representations of men and women in relationship.

The full text of this essay is available to ALS subscribers

Please sign in to access this article and the rest of our archive.

Not a member? Subscribe now from only $24/year

Published 1 October 2006 in Volume 22 No. 4. Subjects: Australian landscape - Literary portrayal, Women - Literary portrayal.

Cite as: Taylor, Cheryl M.. ‘‘What Would Civilisation Be without a Gun?’ The Resistant Land in Sarah Campion’s Burdekin Trilogy.’ Australian Literary Studies, vol. 22, no. 4, 2006. https://doi.org/10.20314/als.8d6b4dbd60.