‘The Scope of Women’s Thought is Necessarily Less’ : The Case of Ada Cambridge

Abstract

Roe argues that Cambridge contemplated the role of women in colonial society and her ability to participate in intellectual discussion in her early poetry. But Cambridge concluded that this was beyond her ability and the revisions between Unspoken Thoughts and The Hand in the Dark and her adoption of fiction (where she champions the safety for women provided by the Romantic English male) as her favoured mode of expression reflect her withdrawal.

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Published 1 October 1972 in Volume 5 No. 4. Subjects: Ada Cambridge, 19th Century Women Writers.

Cite as: Roe, Jill. ‘‘The Scope of Women’s Thought is Necessarily Less’ : The Case of Ada Cambridge.’ Australian Literary Studies, vol. 5, no. 4, 1972. https://doi.org/10.20314/als.8daa052bf8.