Narrative Perspective and Cultural History in ‘Robbery Under Arms’


Rosenberg looks at Robbery Under Arms as a reflection of Boldrewood’s ideas about life. George Storefield and Dick Marston represent different poles between which Browne wished to situate himself. This desire often causes narrative inconsistency as the author intrudes on Dick Marston’s narrative. But the restrictive narrative environment reflects Dick Marston’s condition and so Boldrewood “captures his country’s choice of a culture hero”.

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Published 1 May 1973 in Volume 6 No. 1.

Cite as: Rosenberg, Jerome H.. ‘Narrative Perspective and Cultural History in ‘Robbery Under Arms’.’ Australian Literary Studies, vol. 6, no. 1, 1973.